Family Bonding Through Video Games - Part 2

If you haven’t read through the first part in this series where I talked about the reason for this post, then head on over there for a bit. In that post, I covered Black Ice, Minecraft, Spelunky, and Gauntlet. For this post, I’m going to focus on four puzzle games that we played during 2015. These are all quick games to play that allow you stop at many points along the way. For the most part, they are low stress games with quirky visuals

On to the games …


Limbo is a dark puzzle game where you play as a boy searching for his sister. Along the way, he must traverse dangerous environments, scary creatures, and tricky puzzles that can lead to success or death. The fun of this game is not only in the beautiful black and white imagery, but also in the necessary trial and error approach to solving the puzzles. There are moments where quick action is necessary along with moments of carefully thought out movements. The immediate appeal of Limbo for me was the black and white, film-like visuals.  There are very fluid motions no mater what actions are being performed and lots of ambient sound. This creates a very eerie, lonely environment. We found ourselves becoming very immersed in the game play and becoming scared when the boy was scared. Aside from the visuals and the gameplay there is also the story associated with the game. We found ourselves wondering why things were happening as they were. There are many theories associated with the game. If you’re interested, check them out here (there are spoilers).

Limbo is a dark puzzle game where you play as a boy searching for his sister. Along the way, he must traverse dangerous environments, scary creatures, and tricky puzzles that can lead to success or death. The fun of this game is not only in the beautiful black and white imagery, but also in the necessary trial and error approach to solving the puzzles. There are moments where quick action is necessary along with moments of carefully thought out movements.

The immediate appeal of Limbo for me was the black and white, film-like visuals.  There are very fluid motions no mater what actions are being performed and lots of ambient sound. This creates a very eerie, lonely environment. We found ourselves becoming very immersed in the game play and becoming scared when the boy was scared. Aside from the visuals and the gameplay there is also the story associated with the game. We found ourselves wondering why things were happening as they were. There are many theories associated with the game. If you’re interested, check them out here (there are spoilers).


This game series features four games: Quiet, Please!, Quiet Christmas, Vacation Vexation, and Candy, Please! The goal for most of these games is to solve the puzzles so that your various family members will leave you alone and give you some quiet time. This is a bit different for Candy, Please! as the goal for that game is to get your share of the candy. The puzzles for these games will find you attempting to find ways to turn off the TV, keep kittens quiet, avoid your little brother, and various other tasks as you figure out a way to get alone. These are multi-step puzzles that will require you to collect objects throughout the game and take them to other parts of the game in order to complete a step. One of the enjoyable things about this series is that it follows the same family and characters throughout each of the games. In fact, you can really view each game as a different chapter or story in the lives of that family. We enjoyed playing the games due to their short length and focus on linear puzzle progressions. There were a few times where we weren’t quite sure how to progress, but ended up figuring it out and getting through each of the games. As far as what can be learned from the games, it’s a great one for learning to think through linear logic puzzles. It also allows you to work on your memory as you have to keep track of where you found objects and where you left them the last time you had them. It reminded me a bit of the old Spy vs Spy game on the original Nintendo Entertainment System.

This game series features four games: Quiet, Please!, Quiet Christmas, Vacation Vexation, and Candy, Please! The goal for most of these games is to solve the puzzles so that your various family members will leave you alone and give you some quiet time. This is a bit different for Candy, Please! as the goal for that game is to get your share of the candy.

The puzzles for these games will find you attempting to find ways to turn off the TV, keep kittens quiet, avoid your little brother, and various other tasks as you figure out a way to get alone. These are multi-step puzzles that will require you to collect objects throughout the game and take them to other parts of the game in order to complete a step. One of the enjoyable things about this series is that it follows the same family and characters throughout each of the games. In fact, you can really view each game as a different chapter or story in the lives of that family.

We enjoyed playing the games due to their short length and focus on linear puzzle progressions. There were a few times where we weren’t quite sure how to progress, but ended up figuring it out and getting through each of the games. As far as what can be learned from the games, it’s a great one for learning to think through linear logic puzzles. It also allows you to work on your memory as you have to keep track of where you found objects and where you left them the last time you had them. It reminded me a bit of the old Spy vs Spy game on the original Nintendo Entertainment System.


Haunt the House is a puzzle game that allows you to take on the role of a ghost as you haunt different rooms throughout town. There are multiple episodes that take you to places called Terror Town, Ghost Train, North Pole, and Mansion House. As you travel to each of the available destinations, you’re able to possess objects as your main mechanism for scaring away the humans. Your goal is to empty the rooms and take over control of each location. We enjoyed this game due to its quirky nature where you get to play as a ghost taking over each house or location. There were also some tricky moments where you have to find the right objects to possess in order to get everyone out. Overall, we enjoyed it because it is a quick play with funny moments that we were able to enjoy together.

Haunt the House is a puzzle game that allows you to take on the role of a ghost as you haunt different rooms throughout town. There are multiple episodes that take you to places called Terror Town, Ghost Train, North Pole, and Mansion House. As you travel to each of the available destinations, you’re able to possess objects as your main mechanism for scaring away the humans. Your goal is to empty the rooms and take over control of each location.

We enjoyed this game due to its quirky nature where you get to play as a ghost taking over each house or location. There were also some tricky moments where you have to find the right objects to possess in order to get everyone out. Overall, we enjoyed it because it is a quick play with funny moments that we were able to enjoy together.


Peggle is one of the most popular puzzle games that features the goal of shooting a limited supply of colored balls at a field of colored pegs with the goal of clearing out as many of the pegs as possible. There are power ups that trigger allowing for exciting changes of how the game is played and more explosive clearing pegs. Aside from clearing out the pegs, there is an additional goal of landing the highest score you can. The game mechanic of clearing the pegs is simple; however, by trying to achieve the highest score possible it requires decisions with which pegs to take out first. There are also special powers that can be acquired that are provided by Peggle Masters throughout the game. This game is a great one to play surrounded by family members and friends in the living room while sitting on a couch. The visuals are bright, over the top, and the soundtrack is exciting. The end result is a fun game that can be easily played for hours at a time without getting bored. In addition, Peggle is from the same company that created other high quality games like Bejeweled, Plants vs Zombies, Zuma, Solitaire Blast, and other great casual games for kids.

Peggle is one of the most popular puzzle games that features the goal of shooting a limited supply of colored balls at a field of colored pegs with the goal of clearing out as many of the pegs as possible. There are power ups that trigger allowing for exciting changes of how the game is played and more explosive clearing pegs. Aside from clearing out the pegs, there is an additional goal of landing the highest score you can. The game mechanic of clearing the pegs is simple; however, by trying to achieve the highest score possible it requires decisions with which pegs to take out first. There are also special powers that can be acquired that are provided by Peggle Masters throughout the game.

This game is a great one to play surrounded by family members and friends in the living room while sitting on a couch. The visuals are bright, over the top, and the soundtrack is exciting. The end result is a fun game that can be easily played for hours at a time without getting bored. In addition, Peggle is from the same company that created other high quality games like Bejeweled, Plants vs Zombies, Zuma, Solitaire Blast, and other great casual games for kids.


My goal is to inspire you to grab one of these games, sit down with one (or more) of the kids in your life, and have fun spending time with them. If you play one or more of these games and want to share what you and your kids thought, send me a quick message on TwitterFacebook, or via email. For the next post, I’ll write about games featuring connected toys (e.g., Skylanders).

Thanks for reading!

Coy